Safeguarding poster: you don’t need to keep painful secrets

You are welcome to download and print these posters for free. They have been written with the obstacles which prevent disclosures of child sexual abuse in mind. The feeling of having to ‘keep secrets’ is a common experience for children who have been abused. Feel free to display these posters anywhere where young people might see them.

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Safeguarding poster: child sexual abuse is never the victim’s fault

Victims of child sexual abuse often feel a strong sense of personality responsibility about what happened to them. This can prevent them from telling anyone that they’ve been abused. Please display this poster anywhere where a young victim might see it, to let them know that if they disclose to you, they will not be blamed.

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Safeguarding poster: you deserve to be safe and supported

Display this poster to communicate to young people that their safety is the biggest priority. Sadly, families do not always respond to abuse disclosures in a supportive way. However, it is still crucial that children feel able to talk about abuse so that it can be stopped.

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Safeguarding poster: you did not bring it upon yourself

Abusers are afraid of being discovered and so will say whatever they need to, to keep children silent. This poster sends a message that abused children need to hear: that they are not responsible and can disclose to you or a member of staff at your organisation without fear of being blamed.

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Report: failures related to the CSE investigation in Oxfordshire

This paper highlights the missed opportunities for earlier detection of the widescale CSE which was discovered in Oxfordshire between 2004-2012. The focus is on police failures and how young people were treated during the investigation. The report also looks at how the law might be changed to clarify the safeguarding duties of relevant professionals.

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Report: how are boys trafficked in the sex industry?

This paper highlights the literature and cultural bias against boys and explains how boys are victimised by trafficking circles around the world.

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Report: a brief case for the introduction of mandatory reporting

This short paper addresses the main arguments for and against creating a legal duty to report child abuse. It looks at existing obligations under domestic and international safeguarding law, as well as empirical research on mandatory reporting systems in other countries.

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Report: the safeguarding implications of online suicide communities

This report discusses the risks to young people presented by websites and forums that advocate self-harm and suicidal behaviour. It also looks at the prevention tools available to safeguarding professionals and discusses the concept of ‘education’ in relation to prevention.

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